Google injects generative AI into its cloud security tools | TechCrunch


At its annual Cloud Next conference in Las Vegas, Google on Tuesday introduced new cloud-based security products and services — in addition to updates to existing products and services — aimed at customers managing large, multi-tenant corporate networks.

Many of the announcements had to do with Gemini, Google’s flagship family of generative AI models.

For example, Google unveiled Gemini in Threat Intelligence, a new Gemini-powered component of the company’s Mandiant cybersecurity platform. Now in public preview, Gemini in Threat Intelligence can analyze large portions of potentially malicious code and let users perform natural language searches for ongoing threats or indicators of compromise, as well as summarize open source intelligence reports from around the web.

“Gemini in Threat Intelligence now offers conversational search across Mandiant’s vast and growing repository of threat intelligence directly from frontline investigations,” Sunil Potti, GM of cloud security at Google, wrote in a blog post shared with TechCrunch. “Gemini will navigate users to the most relevant pages in the integrated platform for deeper investigation … Plus, [Google’s malware detection service] VirusTotal now automatically ingests OSINT reports, which Gemini summarizes directly in the platform.”

Elsewhere, Gemini can now assist with cybersecurity investigations in Chronicle, Google’s cybersecurity telemetry offering for cloud customers. Set to roll out by the end of the month, the new capability guides security analysts through their typical workflows, recommending actions based on the context of a security investigation, summarizing security event data and creating breach and exploit detection rules from a chatbot-like interface.

And in Security Command Center, Google’s enterprise cybersecurity and risk management suite, a new Gemini-driven feature lets security teams search for threats using natural language while providing summaries of misconfigurations, vulnerabilities and possible attack paths.

Rounding out the security updates were privileged access manager (in preview), a service that offers just-in-time, time-bound and approval-based access options designed to help mitigate risks tied to privileged access misuse. Google’s also rolling out principal access boundary (in preview, as well), which lets admins implement restrictions on network root-level users so that those users can only access authorized resources within a specifically defined boundary.

Lastly, Autokey (in preview) aims to simplify creating and managing customer encryption keys for high-security use cases, while Audit Manager (also in preview) provides tools for Google Cloud customers in regulated industries to generate proof of compliance for their workloads and cloud-hosted data.

“Generative AI offers tremendous potential to tip the balance in favor of defenders,” Potti wrote in the blog post. “And we continue to infuse AI-driven capabilities into our products.”

Google isn’t the only company attempting to productize generative AI–powered security tooling. Microsoft last year launched a set of services that leverage generative AI to correlate data on attacks while prioritizing cybersecurity incidents. Startups, including Aim Security, are also jumping into the fray, aiming to corner the nascent space.

But with generative AI’s tendency to make mistakes, it remains to be seen whether these tools have staying power.


Software Development in Sri Lanka